TEAM

Meet the People behind THE BOYS’ CLUB OF NEW YORK

Board of Trustees

Executive Committee

  • William B. Tyree, Chairman
  • Valentino D. Carlotti, Secretary
  • Damien R. Dwin, Vice President
  • Averell H. Mortimer, Vice President
  • Alexander T. Robertson, Vice President
  • Kevin W. Stone, Treasurer
  • Stephen Tosh, Executive Director/CEO
  • Lee S. Ainslie III
  • Sara Stowe Ayres
  • Ellen G. Breed
  • Richard M. Cashin, Jr.
  • James F. Curtis III
  • Kitty Northrop Friedman
  • Lewis Hart
  • Barclay G. Jones III
  • Derrick H. Lewis
  • William G. McKnight III
  • Anjali Melwani
  • Calvert S. Moore
  • Michael A. Nickols, Jr.
  • Thorne L. Perkin
  • Robert S. Pitts, Jr.
  • F. Lyon Polk III
  • Mary E. Sheridan
  • Jeffrey A. Spitzer, M.D.
  • Cynthia van Eck
  • Jacqueline R. Williams
  • Scott C. Wilson

Honorary Board

  • Silas R. Anthony, Jr.
  • Friederike K. Biggs
  • Taylor S. Bodman
  • Don Cangelosi
  • Michael Carney
  • Elbridge T. Gerry, Jr.
  • John R. Gordon
  • Linda J. Hickox
  • Robert L. Ireland, Jr.
  • H. Anthony Ittleson
  • Jayne Teagle Keith
  • Elaine Langone
  • Hildegarde E. Mahoney
  • Judith E. Makrianes
  • Edward J. Rappa

Women’s Board

Executive Committee

  • Dara B. O’Hara, President
  • Travis Acquavella, Vice President
  • Stephanie A. Coleman, Vice President
  • D. Brooke Harlow, Assistant Secretary
  • Nathalie G. Kaplan, Vice President
  • Tiffany Moller, Vice President
  • Alexandra Mondre, Vice President
  • Tatiana G.P. Perkin, Secretary
  • Kristin F. Allen
  • Virginia Apple
  • Gabrielle Bacon
  • Elizabeth Bonner
  • Megan Brodsky
  • Helene Comfort
  • Merrill H. Curtis
  • Ellen Niven Deery
  • Carolina de Neufville
  • Eleanor Edelman
  • Cornelia M. Ercklentz
  • Danielle Ganek
  • Cosby W. George
  • Jamee T. Gregory
  • Tracey Huff
  • Julia Dean Karle
  • Stephanie Kearney
  • Karen Klopp
  • Beth Kojima
  • Ros L’Esperance
  • Gigi Mortimer
  • Mary Kathryn Navab
  • Claudia T. Overstrom
  • Yesim Philip
  • Alexandra Robertson
  • Alexia Hamm Ryan
  • Tyler Schiff
  • Burwell Espy Schorr
  • Kathy Araskog Thomas
  • Kari Tiedemann
  • Diane van Amerongen
  • Aerin Lauder Zinterhofer

Honorary Board

  • Virginia S. Burke
  • Louise Grosvenor
  • Allie Hanley
  • Mai Hallingby Harrison
  • Elaine A. Langone
  • Laura H. McCloy
  • Kitty McKnight
  • Muffy Miller
  • Armene L. Milliken
  • Virginia E. Morgan
  • Nancy C. Phelan
  • Lindsey Pryor
  • Barbara Robinson
  • Alice Ross
  • Elizabeth E. Tilghman
  • Thorunn Wathne

Presidents’ Council

  • Sara Stowe Ayres
  • Friederike K. Biggs
  • Amy Griffin
  • Linda J. Hickox
  • Ritchey B. Howe
  • Kathryn Pardoe Irwin
  • Jayne Teagle Keith
  • Hildegarde E. Mahoney
  • Anjali Melwani
  • Monique V. Merrill
  • Nancy Missett
  • Betsy Pitts
  • Hilary Geary Ross
  • Nancy I. Stahl
  • Cynthia van Eck
  • Jacqueline R. Williams

Professional Advisory Council

Bianca J. Baldridge, Ph.D.

Bianca J. Baldridge, Ph.D.

bianca_baldridge@gse.harvard.edu

Bianca J. Baldridge, Ph.D is a Sociologist of Education who studies the socio-political context of community-based youth work and afterschool education. Bianca’s research critically examines the confluence of race, class, and gender, and its impact on educational reforms that shape community-based spaces that engage Black and Latinx youth. She explores the organizational and pedagogical practices employed by youth workers/community-based educators amidst neoliberal education restructuring. Her book, with Stanford University Press, Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work, examines how market-based education reforms, with its emphasis on privatization and accountability, undermines Black community-based organizations’ efforts to support comprehensive youth development opportunities. As a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, Bianca’s current research studies how racial discourse shapes community-based spaces that engage Black youth in predominantly white cities that espouse a liberal and progressive ethos. Bianca’s research has been published in the American Educational Research Journal, Review of Research in Education, Teachers College Record, Contemporary Sociology, and Race, Ethnicity, and Education. Bianca’s experiences as a community-based youth worker in domestic and international contexts continue to inform her research in profound ways.

David L. Bell, MD, MPH

David L. Bell, MD, MPH

David L. Bell, MD, MPH (he, him, his) is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics (College of Physicians & Surgeons) and in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health (Mailman School of Public Health) at Columbia University Medical Center. Since 1999, Dr. Bell has been medical director of the Young Men’s Clinic delivering primary care to adolescent and young adult males and advocating for the right of young men to have access to high quality and respectful services which includes attention to their sexual and reproductive health.

He is currently the President of the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine. He also served on Mayor de Blasio’s Sexual Health Education Task Force. He is on the boards of the Partnership for Male Youth and Promundo Global.

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D.

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D.

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D. (she, her, hers) is a Lecturer in Human Biology and Affiliate of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. She teaches a course on Boys’ Psychosocial Development. Her research highlights boys’ relational strengths and examines the impact of boys’ gender socialization during early childhood and adolescence. She developed curricula for The Representation Project’s film, The Mask You Live In, and currently serves as Chair of Movember Foundation’s Global Men’s Health Advisory Committee and co-Chair of the Board of Directors for Promundo-US.

She is the author of When Boys Become Boys: Development, Relationships, and Masculinity (NYU Press, 2014) and co-editor of Adolescent Boys: Exploring Diverse Cultures of Boyhood (NYU Press, 2004)

Joseph Derrick Nelson, Ph.D.

Joseph Derrick Nelson, Ph.D.

Joseph Derrick Nelson, Ph.D. (he, him, his) is an Associate Professor of Educational Studies at Swarthmore College. Notably, he is Chair of the Black Studies Program, Affiliated Faculty with the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, and Senior Research Fellow with the Center for the Study of Boys’ and Girls’ Lives at the University of Pennsylvania. Trained as a sociologist of education, his research examines race, boyhood, and education within learning environments that largely serve Black students from neighborhoods with concentrated poverty.

His forthcoming book is entitled, (Re)Imagining Black Boyhood: Portraits of Academic Success during the Middle School Years (Harvard Education Press), and he recently co-edited the Routledge Handbook on Boyhood in the United States, with over thirty contributors. In public media, his research has been featured in the Washington Post, The Atlantic, and National Public Radio. In the United States and abroad, he has presented his research at The White House Summit for Children’s Media and Toys, the Ideas Festival of the Aspen Institute, and the International Boys’ School Coalition. Last year (2020), he was named a Co-Editor of the historic journal, Men and Masculinities. In the high-poverty neighborhood where he grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he taught first-grade in a single-sex class of Black boys.

Tao Leigh Goffe, Ph.D.

Tao Leigh Goffe, Ph.D.

Tao Leigh Goffe (she/her/hers) is a London-born, Black British writer, theorist, and interdisciplinary artist who grew up between the UK and New York. Specializing in colonial histories of race, climate, and sound technology, Dr. Goffe is writing a book called AFTER EDEN on how the climate crisis is a racial crisis (Doubleday and Hamish Hamilton (Penguin UK)). She lives and works in Manhattan. Her work explores Black diasporic intellectual histories, political, and ecological life. She is a member of NEW INC, an incubator for art and technology led by the New Museum in New York City. She studied English literature at Princeton University before pursuing a PhD at Yale University.

 

Dr. Goffe’s research and curatorial work is rooted in literatures and theories of labor that center Black feminist engagements with Indigeneity and Asian diasporic racial formations. Much of her artistic and sound design practice examines the bedrock of colonial histories.  Tao has provided screenwriting consultation for screenplays, TV show development, and has been an expert legal witness on histories of Black and Asian race relations for court cases. Her life story was featured as the subject of an episode of Hulu’s Your Attention Please, Initiative 29, a television show that celebrates Black creatives and futures on the 29th of each month.

 

Committed to building intellectual communities beyond institutions, she is the founder of the Dark Laboratory, an engine for the study of race, technology, and ecology through digital storytelling (virtual reality (VR) augmented reality (AR) (XR)). Dr. Goffe is also the Executive Director of the Afro-Asia Group, an organization that centers the intersections of African and Asian diasporas, futurity, and solidarities.

 

An avid home cook, she gives lectures on food histories at museums and has led corporate cooking demos. From aubergine curry to jerk snapper to vegan Jamaican patties, her recipes have been published in various collections and cookbooks. Tao documents her cooking experimentation on ‘Gastropoetics of Tao’ her Instagram account @taoleighgoffe. She tweets @taoleighgoffetaoleigh@gmail.com 

 

Saed Deryck Hill, Ph.D.

Saed Deryck Hill, Ph.D.

Saed Deryck Hill, Ph.D. (he, him, his) is an Assistant Director of Prevention and Masculine Engagement at the Center for Awareness, Response, and Education (CARE) at Northwestern University and a counseling psychologist. Saed’s work focuses on leading collaborative efforts at Northwestern in masculine engagement programming and education around healthy masculinity which includes serving as the advisor for the Masculinity, Allyship, Reflection, Solidarity (MARS) peer education group as well as the management, implementation, and curriculum development of the NU Men Healthy Masculinity program each quarter. Saed also serves as a confidential survivor advocate and support for students impacted by sexual violence, relationship violence, and stalking.

Prior to joining Northwestern in August of 2018, Saed worked for Planned Parenthood Great Plains (PPGP) as the Senior Education and Outreach Coordinator in charge of delivering comprehensive and sex explorative sexual health programming to K-12 and college students across Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and mid-Missouri. Saed is originally from Queens, NY and spends much of his free time psychoanalyzing reality TV shows as well as listening to Aaliyah on Spotify.

Michael A. Lindsey, Ph.D., MSW, MPH

Michael A. Lindsey, Ph.D., MSW, MPH

Michael A. Lindsey, PHD, MSW, MPH is a noted scholar in the fields of child and adolescent mental health, as well as a leader in the search for knowledge and solutions to generational poverty and inequality. He is the Dean and Paulette Goddard Professor of Social Work at NYU Silver School of Social Work, and an Aspen Health Innovators Fellow. Additionally, Dr. Lindsey led the working group of experts supporting the Congressional Black Caucus Emergency Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health, which created the report Ring the Alarm: The Crisis of Black Youth Suicide in America. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academies of Practice (NAP) in Social Work and Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. Dr. Lindsey was also appointed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF). In 2023, he was appointed to the New York City Board of Health. Prior to being named NYU Silver’s Dean, Dr. Lindsey was the Constance and Martin Silver Professor of Poverty Studies and Executive Director of the NYU McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research. Dr. Lindsey serves on the editorial boards of the following journals: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Psychiatric Services, and School Mental Health. The politics news outlet City & State New York has recognized him in the 2022 and 2023 Higher Education Power 100 lists, as well as the 2021 Mental Health Power 50 list. He is a Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. He holds a PhD in social work and MPH from the University of Pittsburgh, an MSW from Howard University, and a BA in sociology from Morehouse College. Dr. Lindsey also completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in public health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
ml4361@nyu.edu / amity.eills@nyu.edu (assistant)

Christopher S. Reigeluth, Ph.D.

Christopher S. Reigeluth, Ph.D.

Christopher S. Reigeluth, Ph.D. is a professor, author, and licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in boys and men’s mental health, masculine gender socialization, and child and adolescent psychology and therapy. He currently serves as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Clinical Psychology at Oregon Health & Science University. Below is some additional information on background, training, and interests.  Dr. Reigeluth completed his doctoral training at Clark University including a two-year fellowship at the Yale University Child Study Center. Throughout graduate school and his career, Dr. Reigeluth’s clinical training and academic interests have included boys and men’s mental health and understanding ways that dominant messages about “manhood” can influence well-being. An additional area of specialization is adolescent masculinities and treatment engagement.

 

Dr. Reigeluth’s research explores adolescent boys, masculine gender socialization, and psychological well-being. For five years, he directed the Masculinities and Mental Health Research Group at Pacific University. His publications include peer-review journal articles and book chapters, along with The Masculinity Workbook for Teens: Discover What Being a Guy Means to You. Dr. Reigeluth’s current academic pursuits focus on school-based gender education and awareness-building programs for teen boys and teachers, along with treatment engagement interventions. He co-developed and is piloting a school-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) group for teens with anxiety. See Publications for more information.

 

Dr. Reigeluth is licensed in the state of Oregon (No. 2939). As a clinical psychologist, his primary orientation and therapeutic modality is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a third wave cognitive behavioral therapy. Along with boys and men’s mental health, Dr. Reigeluth’s clinical expertise includes child and adolescent trauma, anxiety and other stress-related conditions. He has worked extensively with individuals, families and groups. Dr. Reigeluth provides therapy and supervises doctoral students and medical fellows at the Oregon Health & Science University – Child and Adolescent Outpatient Clinic.  reigelut@ohsu.edu 

Carlos Santos, Ph.D.

Carlos Santos, Ph.D.

Carlos Santos, Ph.D (he, him, his) is Assistant Professor of Social Welfare at UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. He received his PhD in Developmental Psychology from New York University. His research draws on diverse disciplines, theories and methods to better understand how oppressions (e.g., racism, heterosexism, etc.) overlap to create unique conditions for individuals; conditions that are shaped by the contexts one occupies, with implications for one’s development and well-being. He is interested in how individuals cope with these overlapping stressors through attitudes associated with membership in different social groups (e.g., having pride in one’s ethnic-racial and/or sexual identity group), and positions one occupies (e.g., being undocumented), and whether such coping attenuate or amplify the negative consequences of overlapping oppressions on mental health, educational outcomes, and civic engagement. His research is concerned with questions such as: How are racist and heterosexist events uniquely and jointly related to mental health among queer Latinx youth? Does having pride in being Latinx and/or queer buffer or amplify these effects? Ultimately, the aim is to translate this research into practical intervention.

Dr. Santos has authored nearly 30 peer reviewed publications and co-edited one book: Studying Ethnic Identity: Methodological and Conceptual Approaches Across Disciplines with Adriana Umaña-Taylor. He has also co-edited a peer reviewed journal section on the applications of intersectionality to the helping professions published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and he co-edited a special issue on the integration of an intersectionality lens in developmental science published in New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development.

Adriana Villavicencio, Ph.D.

Adriana Villavicencio, Ph.D.

Adriana Villavicencio, Ph.D. (she, her, hers) is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Irvine. Her research is focused on K-12 educational policy and school practice that deepen or disrupt inequities for minoritized communities of students and families. For nearly a decade, she conducted research at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at NYU—a Research-Practice Partnership with the NYC Department of Education (DOE).

Dr. Villavicencio’s work includes mixed-method studies on turnaround middle schools, small high schools in NYC, schools serving newly arrived immigrant English Learners, and a racial justice program embedded in culturally diverse elementary schools.

She is the author of Am I My Brother’s Keeper: Educational Opportunities and Outcomes for Black and Brown Boys, published by Harvard Education Press. This book examines how districts and schools can embed racial equity into sustainable policies and practices in contrast to initiatives that come and go. It also provides a set of concrete approaches and recommendations, so that other districts and schools can take up similar efforts with even more robust results.

Prior to becoming a researcher, she taught high school English in Oakland, California and Brooklyn, New York. She also worked on the development of a new school in Bangalore, India. Dr. Villavicencio earned her Ph.D. in education leadership and policy from the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

José Luis Vilson, Ph.D. Candidate

José Luis Vilson, Ph.D. Candidate

José Luis Vilson, Ph.D. Candidate (he, him, his) is a veteran educator, writer, speaker, and activist in New York City, NY. He has spoken about education, math, and race for a number of organizations and publications, including the New York Times, The Guardian, TED, El Diario / La Prensa and The Atlantic. He’s a National Board Certified teacher, a Math for America Master Teacher, and the executive director of EduColor, an organization dedicated to race and social justice issues in education. He is currently a doctoral student studying sociology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is now on the board of directors for the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards and PowerMyLearning.

He is the author of This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education.

Bianca J. Baldridge, Ph.D.

Read Bio

bianca_baldridge@gse.harvard.edu

Bianca J. Baldridge, Ph.D is a Sociologist of Education who studies the socio-political context of community-based youth work and afterschool education. Bianca’s research critically examines the confluence of race, class, and gender, and its impact on educational reforms that shape community-based spaces that engage Black and Latinx youth. She explores the organizational and pedagogical practices employed by youth workers/community-based educators amidst neoliberal education restructuring. Her book, with Stanford University Press, Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work, examines how market-based education reforms, with its emphasis on privatization and accountability, undermines Black community-based organizations’ efforts to support comprehensive youth development opportunities. As a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, Bianca’s current research studies how racial discourse shapes community-based spaces that engage Black youth in predominantly white cities that espouse a liberal and progressive ethos. Bianca’s research has been published in the American Educational Research Journal, Review of Research in Education, Teachers College Record, Contemporary Sociology, and Race, Ethnicity, and Education. Bianca’s experiences as a community-based youth worker in domestic and international contexts continue to inform her research in profound ways.

David L. Bell, MD, MPH

Read Bio

David L. Bell, MD, MPH (he, him, his) is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics (College of Physicians & Surgeons) and in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health (Mailman School of Public Health) at Columbia University Medical Center. Since 1999, Dr. Bell has been medical director of the Young Men’s Clinic delivering primary care to adolescent and young adult males and advocating for the right of young men to have access to high quality and respectful services which includes attention to their sexual and reproductive health.

He is currently the President of the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine. He also served on Mayor de Blasio’s Sexual Health Education Task Force. He is on the boards of the Partnership for Male Youth and Promundo Global.

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D.

Read Bio

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D. (she, her, hers) is a Lecturer in Human Biology and Affiliate of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. She teaches a course on Boys’ Psychosocial Development. Her research highlights boys’ relational strengths and examines the impact of boys’ gender socialization during early childhood and adolescence. She developed curricula for The Representation Project’s film, The Mask You Live In, and currently serves as Chair of Movember Foundation’s Global Men’s Health Advisory Committee and co-Chair of the Board of Directors for Promundo-US.

She is the author of When Boys Become Boys: Development, Relationships, and Masculinity (NYU Press, 2014) and co-editor of Adolescent Boys: Exploring Diverse Cultures of Boyhood (NYU Press, 2004)

Joseph Derrick Nelson, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Joseph Derrick Nelson, Ph.D. (he, him, his) is an Associate Professor of Educational Studies at Swarthmore College. Notably, he is Chair of the Black Studies Program, Affiliated Faculty with the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, and Senior Research Fellow with the Center for the Study of Boys’ and Girls’ Lives at the University of Pennsylvania. Trained as a sociologist of education, his research examines race, boyhood, and education within learning environments that largely serve Black students from neighborhoods with concentrated poverty.

His forthcoming book is entitled, (Re)Imagining Black Boyhood: Portraits of Academic Success during the Middle School Years (Harvard Education Press), and he recently co-edited the Routledge Handbook on Boyhood in the United States, with over thirty contributors. In public media, his research has been featured in the Washington Post, The Atlantic, and National Public Radio. In the United States and abroad, he has presented his research at The White House Summit for Children’s Media and Toys, the Ideas Festival of the Aspen Institute, and the International Boys’ School Coalition. Last year (2020), he was named a Co-Editor of the historic journal, Men and Masculinities. In the high-poverty neighborhood where he grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he taught first-grade in a single-sex class of Black boys.

Tao Leigh Goffe, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Tao Leigh Goffe (she/her/hers) is a London-born, Black British writer, theorist, and interdisciplinary artist who grew up between the UK and New York. Specializing in colonial histories of race, climate, and sound technology, Dr. Goffe is writing a book called AFTER EDEN on how the climate crisis is a racial crisis (Doubleday and Hamish Hamilton (Penguin UK)). She lives and works in Manhattan. Her work explores Black diasporic intellectual histories, political, and ecological life. She is a member of NEW INC, an incubator for art and technology led by the New Museum in New York City. She studied English literature at Princeton University before pursuing a PhD at Yale University.

 

Dr. Goffe’s research and curatorial work is rooted in literatures and theories of labor that center Black feminist engagements with Indigeneity and Asian diasporic racial formations. Much of her artistic and sound design practice examines the bedrock of colonial histories.  Tao has provided screenwriting consultation for screenplays, TV show development, and has been an expert legal witness on histories of Black and Asian race relations for court cases. Her life story was featured as the subject of an episode of Hulu’s Your Attention Please, Initiative 29, a television show that celebrates Black creatives and futures on the 29th of each month.

 

Committed to building intellectual communities beyond institutions, she is the founder of the Dark Laboratory, an engine for the study of race, technology, and ecology through digital storytelling (virtual reality (VR) augmented reality (AR) (XR)). Dr. Goffe is also the Executive Director of the Afro-Asia Group, an organization that centers the intersections of African and Asian diasporas, futurity, and solidarities.

 

An avid home cook, she gives lectures on food histories at museums and has led corporate cooking demos. From aubergine curry to jerk snapper to vegan Jamaican patties, her recipes have been published in various collections and cookbooks. Tao documents her cooking experimentation on ‘Gastropoetics of Tao’ her Instagram account @taoleighgoffe. She tweets @taoleighgoffetaoleigh@gmail.com 

 

Saed Deryck Hill, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Saed Deryck Hill, Ph.D. (he, him, his) is an Assistant Director of Prevention and Masculine Engagement at the Center for Awareness, Response, and Education (CARE) at Northwestern University and a counseling psychologist. Saed’s work focuses on leading collaborative efforts at Northwestern in masculine engagement programming and education around healthy masculinity which includes serving as the advisor for the Masculinity, Allyship, Reflection, Solidarity (MARS) peer education group as well as the management, implementation, and curriculum development of the NU Men Healthy Masculinity program each quarter. Saed also serves as a confidential survivor advocate and support for students impacted by sexual violence, relationship violence, and stalking.

Prior to joining Northwestern in August of 2018, Saed worked for Planned Parenthood Great Plains (PPGP) as the Senior Education and Outreach Coordinator in charge of delivering comprehensive and sex explorative sexual health programming to K-12 and college students across Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and mid-Missouri. Saed is originally from Queens, NY and spends much of his free time psychoanalyzing reality TV shows as well as listening to Aaliyah on Spotify.

Michael A. Lindsey, Ph.D., MSW, MPH

Read Bio

Michael A. Lindsey, PHD, MSW, MPH is a noted scholar in the fields of child and adolescent mental health, as well as a leader in the search for knowledge and solutions to generational poverty and inequality. He is the Dean and Paulette Goddard Professor of Social Work at NYU Silver School of Social Work, and an Aspen Health Innovators Fellow. Additionally, Dr. Lindsey led the working group of experts supporting the Congressional Black Caucus Emergency Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health, which created the report Ring the Alarm: The Crisis of Black Youth Suicide in America. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academies of Practice (NAP) in Social Work and Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. Dr. Lindsey was also appointed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF). In 2023, he was appointed to the New York City Board of Health. Prior to being named NYU Silver’s Dean, Dr. Lindsey was the Constance and Martin Silver Professor of Poverty Studies and Executive Director of the NYU McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research. Dr. Lindsey serves on the editorial boards of the following journals: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Psychiatric Services, and School Mental Health. The politics news outlet City & State New York has recognized him in the 2022 and 2023 Higher Education Power 100 lists, as well as the 2021 Mental Health Power 50 list. He is a Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. He holds a PhD in social work and MPH from the University of Pittsburgh, an MSW from Howard University, and a BA in sociology from Morehouse College. Dr. Lindsey also completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in public health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
ml4361@nyu.edu / amity.eills@nyu.edu (assistant)

Christopher S. Reigeluth, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Christopher S. Reigeluth, Ph.D. is a professor, author, and licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in boys and men’s mental health, masculine gender socialization, and child and adolescent psychology and therapy. He currently serves as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Clinical Psychology at Oregon Health & Science University. Below is some additional information on background, training, and interests.  Dr. Reigeluth completed his doctoral training at Clark University including a two-year fellowship at the Yale University Child Study Center. Throughout graduate school and his career, Dr. Reigeluth’s clinical training and academic interests have included boys and men’s mental health and understanding ways that dominant messages about “manhood” can influence well-being. An additional area of specialization is adolescent masculinities and treatment engagement.

 

Dr. Reigeluth’s research explores adolescent boys, masculine gender socialization, and psychological well-being. For five years, he directed the Masculinities and Mental Health Research Group at Pacific University. His publications include peer-review journal articles and book chapters, along with The Masculinity Workbook for Teens: Discover What Being a Guy Means to You. Dr. Reigeluth’s current academic pursuits focus on school-based gender education and awareness-building programs for teen boys and teachers, along with treatment engagement interventions. He co-developed and is piloting a school-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) group for teens with anxiety. See Publications for more information.

 

Dr. Reigeluth is licensed in the state of Oregon (No. 2939). As a clinical psychologist, his primary orientation and therapeutic modality is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a third wave cognitive behavioral therapy. Along with boys and men’s mental health, Dr. Reigeluth’s clinical expertise includes child and adolescent trauma, anxiety and other stress-related conditions. He has worked extensively with individuals, families and groups. Dr. Reigeluth provides therapy and supervises doctoral students and medical fellows at the Oregon Health & Science University – Child and Adolescent Outpatient Clinic.  reigelut@ohsu.edu 

Carlos Santos, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Carlos Santos, Ph.D (he, him, his) is Assistant Professor of Social Welfare at UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. He received his PhD in Developmental Psychology from New York University. His research draws on diverse disciplines, theories and methods to better understand how oppressions (e.g., racism, heterosexism, etc.) overlap to create unique conditions for individuals; conditions that are shaped by the contexts one occupies, with implications for one’s development and well-being. He is interested in how individuals cope with these overlapping stressors through attitudes associated with membership in different social groups (e.g., having pride in one’s ethnic-racial and/or sexual identity group), and positions one occupies (e.g., being undocumented), and whether such coping attenuate or amplify the negative consequences of overlapping oppressions on mental health, educational outcomes, and civic engagement. His research is concerned with questions such as: How are racist and heterosexist events uniquely and jointly related to mental health among queer Latinx youth? Does having pride in being Latinx and/or queer buffer or amplify these effects? Ultimately, the aim is to translate this research into practical intervention.

Dr. Santos has authored nearly 30 peer reviewed publications and co-edited one book: Studying Ethnic Identity: Methodological and Conceptual Approaches Across Disciplines with Adriana Umaña-Taylor. He has also co-edited a peer reviewed journal section on the applications of intersectionality to the helping professions published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and he co-edited a special issue on the integration of an intersectionality lens in developmental science published in New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development.

Adriana Villavicencio, Ph.D.

Read Bio

Adriana Villavicencio, Ph.D. (she, her, hers) is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Irvine. Her research is focused on K-12 educational policy and school practice that deepen or disrupt inequities for minoritized communities of students and families. For nearly a decade, she conducted research at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at NYU—a Research-Practice Partnership with the NYC Department of Education (DOE).

Dr. Villavicencio’s work includes mixed-method studies on turnaround middle schools, small high schools in NYC, schools serving newly arrived immigrant English Learners, and a racial justice program embedded in culturally diverse elementary schools.

She is the author of Am I My Brother’s Keeper: Educational Opportunities and Outcomes for Black and Brown Boys, published by Harvard Education Press. This book examines how districts and schools can embed racial equity into sustainable policies and practices in contrast to initiatives that come and go. It also provides a set of concrete approaches and recommendations, so that other districts and schools can take up similar efforts with even more robust results.

Prior to becoming a researcher, she taught high school English in Oakland, California and Brooklyn, New York. She also worked on the development of a new school in Bangalore, India. Dr. Villavicencio earned her Ph.D. in education leadership and policy from the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

José Luis Vilson, Ph.D. Candidate

Read Bio

José Luis Vilson, Ph.D. Candidate (he, him, his) is a veteran educator, writer, speaker, and activist in New York City, NY. He has spoken about education, math, and race for a number of organizations and publications, including the New York Times, The Guardian, TED, El Diario / La Prensa and The Atlantic. He’s a National Board Certified teacher, a Math for America Master Teacher, and the executive director of EduColor, an organization dedicated to race and social justice issues in education. He is currently a doctoral student studying sociology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is now on the board of directors for the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards and PowerMyLearning.

He is the author of This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education.

Staff

Administration

  • Avita Bansee | Managing Director of Communications & Partnerships
  • Joshua Beacham | Development Associate
  • Michelle Brown | Director of Human Resources
  • Ravali Ceyyur | Managing Director of Development
  • Yaritza Cortes | Chief of Staff
  • Tara Cotumaccio | Institutional Giving Manager
  • Jermaine Foster | IT Associate
  • Mallory Hanna | Director of Finance
  • Prospero Herrera | Director of Program Development and Evaluation
  • Cinda Lawrence | Executive Associate
  • Didier Le Solliec | IT Manager
  • Jessica Michel | Human Resources Manager
  • Frank Moraca | Director of Financial Administration
  • Maria Rivera | Finance Associate
  • Michael Stultz | Director of IT
  • Stephen Tosh | Executive Director, CEO
  • William Yturbides | Communications and Graphic Design Manager

Abbe Clubhouse

  • Robyn Bayetis | Social Worker
  • Dana McBean | Operations Associate
  • Ron Britt | Managing Director of Programs
  • Karina Cerrato | Assistant Clubhouse Director
  • April Frazier | Director of Restorative Programming
  • Marvin Jeffcoat | Maintenance Superintendent
  • Dionys Jimenez | Education Director
  • Orlando Nazario | Physical Education Director
  • Kaitlyn Ortiz | Explorer Director
  • Elizabeth Ramirez | Operations Manager
  • Venket Varadarajan | Youth Director

Gerry Clubhouse

  • Antonio Aponte | Director of Education and Career Services
  • Jonathan Duperon | Assistant Clubhouse Director
  • Jeffrey Fisher | Education Director
  • Cristy Gonzalez | Youth Director
  • Fred Guzman | Explorer Director
  • Amar Kelly | Physical Education Director
  • Robert Martinez | Maintenance Superintendent
  • Felicita Rivera | Operations Associate
  • Carmela Rubio | Operations Manager
  • Terrence Taylor | Gerry Clubhouse Director

Harriman Base Camp

  • Ron Britt | Managing Director of Programs
  • Donnaree Williamson | Director of Camp Administration and Community Relations

Major Owens Health & Wellness Community Center Operations Support Staff

  • Mahmoud Fleary | Owens Center Director
  • Cesar Gonzalez | Operations Manager
  • Diniece Howell | Marketing and Events Manager
  • Dudley Julien | Operations Director
  • Monique Fowler | Front Desk Lead
  • Kenler Ulysee | Operations Assistant

BCNY at Boys Prep

  • Briana McCall | Director of BCNY at Boys Prep